The Flag of Vanuatu

The flag of Vanuatu is a symbol of the nation's identity, featuring a field that is divided horizontally by a Y-shaped pattern, representing the archipelago's island geography. The colors used are black, green, red, and yellow. A black isosceles triangle is on the hoist side, bearing a yellow emblem of a boar's tusk encircling two crossed namele leaves. The yellow, black, and green bands, along with the red parallelogram, carry significant cultural and political meanings, reflecting the country's natural beauty, cultural heritage, and history.

The Flag of Vanuatu

History

The flag of Vanuatu was officially adopted on February 18, 1980, following the country's independence from joint British and French rule. The design was chosen as a result of a national flag contest, signifying the unity and identity of the new nation. The colors represent the political parties active at the time of independence, with green for the Nagriamel movement, black for the Melanesian people, and red for their struggle for freedom. The yellow symbolizes Christianity and peace, the boar's tusk is a traditional symbol of prosperity, and the namele leaves represent peace. The flag has remained unchanged since its adoption, serving as a powerful emblem of Vanuatu's sovereignty, cultural diversity, and aspirations.