The Flag of Guam

The flag of Guam features a deep blue field that represents the island's oceanic surroundings and sky. In the center is an almond-shaped emblem, symbolic of the slingshot stones used by the island's indigenous Chamorro people. The emblem contains a depiction of Agaña Bay with a coconut tree, a flying proa (a local outrigger canoe), and a red border that signifies the blood sacrificed in World War II. The shape of the emblem and its elements are a testament to Guam's unique culture, history, and natural beauty.

The Flag of Guam

History

The flag of Guam was officially adopted on February 9, 1948, but its design was conceived in 1917 by Helen L. Paul, the wife of a U.S. Navy officer stationed on the island. The original design was created as part of a project to design a flag for Guam, which at the time did not have its own flag despite being an American territory since 1898 following the Spanish-American War. The flag underwent minor modifications over the years, including a change from a territorial seal to a coat of arms in the center emblem in the 1960s and adjustments to the size and positioning of the emblem in 1989. The flag's design reflects both the deep cultural heritage of the Chamorro people and the influences of colonial history, embodying the spirit and resilience of Guam's inhabitants.