The Flag of South Korea

The flag of South Korea, also known as the Taegukgi, features a white background symbolizing peace and purity. At its center is a red and blue Taeguk (a yin-yang symbol), representing the balance of opposite forces. Surrounding the Taeguk are four black trigrams, each standing for one of the four classical elements: heaven, fire, water, and earth. The overall design symbolizes the principles of movement and harmony.

The Flag of South Korea

History

The concept of the Taegukgi was introduced in the late 19th century, amidst Korea's efforts to assert its sovereignty while facing pressures from Japan and China. The flag was officially adopted on March 6, 1883, by King Gojong of the Joseon Dynasty. Throughout the Japanese occupation from 1910 to 1945, the public display of the Taegukgi was banned. However, it became a symbol of resistance and the desire for independence during this period. After the liberation of Korea in 1945 and the subsequent division of the country, the flag was adopted by South Korea on October 15, 1949. It has since undergone minor modifications, but the essential design and symbolism have remained the same, embodying the nation's ideals and cultural heritage.