The City of London

The flag of the City of London consists of a white background with a red St. George's Cross in the center, which is the patron saint of England. In the top left corner, positioned on the upper segment of the cross, is the sword of Saint Paul, symbolizing the martyrdom of Paul the Apostle. The sword is depicted pointing upwards and is colored black. The design is simple yet deeply symbolic, representing the city's historical and religious connections. The flag's proportions are traditionally 2:3, making it rectangular in shape.

The City of London

History

The flag of the City of London has its origins deeply rooted in English history, reflecting the city's unique status and governance. The use of St. George's Cross dates back to the medieval period, symbolizing England and its patron saint, George. The addition of the sword of Saint Paul is specific to the City of London and distinguishes the city's flag from the English national flag. This emblem is directly associated with the City of London's authority and its historical independence within the United Kingdom. The sword specifically represents the sword that beheaded Paul the Apostle, and it has been a symbol of the City of London since at least the 17th century, though its usage likely predates this period. Over time, the flag has become a potent symbol of the City of London's enduring heritage and its distinct identity within the broader context of London and the UK. Despite changes over the centuries, the flag remains a timeless representation of the city's rich history and its significance in the nation's cultural and political landscape.