The Flag of Chicago

The flag of Chicago consists of two blue horizontal stripes on a white field, with four red six-pointed stars arranged in a horizontal row in the center of the flag. The flag's proportions are a ratio of 2:3. Each element of the design has symbolic meaning related to the city's history and geography. The white stripes represent the North, West, and South sides of the city. The top blue stripe represents Lake Michigan and the North Branch of the Chicago River, while the bottom blue stripe represents the South Branch of the Chicago River and the Great Canal. The stars symbolize important events in Chicago's history, with each of the six points of the stars representing significant values or concepts.

The Flag of Chicago

History

The flag of Chicago was designed by Wallace Rice and was adopted on April 4, 1917, after a design competition held by the Chicago Municipal Flag Commission. The original flag featured two stars, which were meant to symbolize the Chicago Fire of 1871 and the World's Columbian Exposition of 1893. A third star was added in 1933 to represent the Century of Progress Exposition, and a fourth in 1939 to honor Fort Dearborn, which played a pivotal role in the city's early history. Over the years, there have been proposals to add a fifth star to commemorate significant events, such as the election of Barack Obama as President of the United States, but as of the last update, the flag remains with its four stars. The design and symbolism of the flag reflect Chicago's history of resilience and growth, and it is widely regarded as one of the most iconic city flags in the United States.