The Royal Banner of Scotland

The Royal Banner of Scotland, also known as the Lion Rampant of Scotland, is a historic flag that features a red lion rampant with a blue tongue and claws, set against a gold (yellow) field. The lion is within a double red border embellished with fleur-de-lis, which is often referred to as the royal tressure. The flag's design is heraldic and has been associated with Scottish royalty for centuries. Unlike the national flag of Scotland, the Saltire, the Royal Banner is specifically associated with the monarch and its use by private citizens is technically restricted by law, being intended for use only on government and royal buildings or by the monarch himself.

The Royal Banner of Scotland

History

The history of the Royal Banner of Scotland dates back to the 12th century, though the exact origins are somewhat unclear. It is believed to have been used by King William I of Scotland (1143-1214), also known as William the Lion, which is where the symbol of the lion rampant may originate. Over the centuries, the flag has been used in various battles and royal events, symbolizing Scottish sovereignty and pride. The double tressure flory-counter-flory (the double red border with fleur-de-lis) is thought to have been added by Robert the Bruce in the 14th century, symbolizing loyalty and royal authority. Throughout Scotland's history under both independent and unified British rule, the Royal Banner has remained a powerful symbol of Scotland's heritage and royal lineage. Its use is regulated by the Lord Lyon King of Arms, the official responsible for heraldry in Scotland, and it continues to represent the Scottish monarch at official and ceremonial occasions.