The Flag of The European Union

The flag of the European Union (EU) consists of a circle of twelve golden (yellow) stars on a blue background. The stars are positioned centrally on the flag and are arranged in a circle to symbolize unity, solidarity, and harmony among the peoples of Europe. The number of stars has nothing to do with the number of member states; the circle of twelve stars represents completeness and perfection. The blue background symbolizes the West and the sky above the Western world. The flag's design is simple yet powerful, conveying the idea of a united Europe without directly representing any specific member states.

The Flag of The European Union

History

The history of the European Union flag dates back to 1955, when it was adopted by the Council of Europe to symbolize unity and identity in Europe beyond the founding six member states of the European Economic Community. Originally intended to represent Europe as a whole, the flag was later adopted by the European Communities (the precursor to the EU) in 1985. Since then, it has come to be recognized as the official emblem of the European Union. The flag's design, a circle of twelve golden stars on a blue background, was created by Arsène Heitz and Paul M. G. Lévy. It was chosen from among numerous proposals for its powerful symbolic representation of unity and peace in Europe. The adoption of the flag marked a significant step in the efforts to foster a common European identity and has since become an enduring symbol of the European Union and its ideals of unity, solidarity, and harmony among its member states.